collections

 

 
 

Source: GIA

The Star of Asia  The 330-carat Star of Asia is in the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. – Courtesy Boltin Picture Library/The Bridgeman Art Library

The Star of Asia
The 330-carat Star of Asia is in the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. – Courtesy Boltin Picture Library/The Bridgeman Art Library

 
The Star of India   The 563-carat Star of India is in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History. -Chip Clark, Smithsonian Institution

The Star of India
The 563-carat Star of India is in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History. -Chip Clark, Smithsonian Institution

Star Sapphire

Star sapphires are rare beautiful stones that maintain a high value in the market. Their characteristic intersecting light bands are best presented under a direct light source. The six rayed star light will appear across the surface of the stone.  

This rare phenomenon, called asterism, appears when a gemstone is cut with a precise orientation to its rutile inclusions . Once the specific orientation is found, the top of the stone will be cut into a smooth dome. The en cabochon cut brings out the star effects best. 

Star sapphires are ideal for jewellery that are exposed to one direct light source.  You can find our star sapphire collection in our E-boutique. 
 

 

ALEXANDRITE

Source: JTV 

Source: JTV 

Source: Chemistry Blog

Source: Chemistry Blog

The alexandrite is from the family of chrysoberyl. Chrysoberyl is relatively common but the gemstone’s variety, alexandrite, is one of the rarest and can be very expensive. Alexandrite was named after Tsar Alexander II of Russia. It is known for its dramatic colour change. It is famously described as “an emerald by day, a ruby by night.” The colour change is effected by white light and warm light.

We have a stunning alexandrite in our e-boutique. Take a look now!